About

 

Background


In the fall of 2015, Mayor Bill de Blasio and Chancellor Carmen Fariña announced an ambitious set of goals for New York City schools: by 2026, 80% of our students will graduate high school on time, and two-thirds of our students will be college ready.

There are eight initiatives that comprise the Equity and Excellence agenda that will ensure all students receive a world-class education and have the opportunity to reach their full potential. Computer Science For All (CS4All) is one of these Equity and Excellence initiatives.

There are eight initiatives that comprise the Equity and Excellence agenda that will ensure all students receive a world-class education and have the opportunity to reach their full potential. Computer Science For All (CS4All) is one of these Equity and Excellence initiatives.


Thanks to this unprecedented public to private partnership, all NYC public school students will receive a meaningful, high‐quality Computer Science (CS) education at each school level: elementary, middle, and high school by 2025.

Over the next 10 years, the DOE will train nearly 5,000 teachers who will bring CS education to the city’s about 1.1 million public school students.

Through CS4All, NYC students will learn to think with the computer, instead of using computers to simply convey their thinking. Students will learn computational thinking, problem-solving, creativity and critical thinking. They will also learn to collaborate and build relationships with peers, communicate and create with technologies, and to better understand technologies we interact with daily.

These skills will be integral to student success in higher education, the 21st-century job market, and beyond.


All schools will provide CS education to all students by 2025

Schools can implement a CS education in a way that aligns best to their educational vision. Computer science can be a semester course, a multi-year sequence, or incorporated into other content area courses (e.g. science, math, art,) in middle and high schools. For elementary schools, CS can be incorporated into core classes or cluster classes like art, music, or technology.

The DOE and partner organizations will offer an array of professional learning opportunities to train nearly 5,000 elementary, middle and high school teachers. This will ensure that all students receive at least one meaningful, high-quality CS learning experience at each school level, across the range of implementation options.


What Does a Computer Science Education Look Like?

Computer science can be the subject of a semester-long course, a multi-year sequence, or incorporated into other content areas, such as science, math, or art.

When you enter a computer science classroom you may find students:

  • Working together to solve problems
  • Writing code and adapting existing code to their own projects
  • Working with teachers and peers to troubleshoot code
  • Building physical prototypes as part of the design process
  • Participating in unplugged activities (that do not use technology), to introduce them to CS fundamentals
  • Using online resources to look up examples and find resources to assist with problem-solving

Funders

CS4All is a public-private partnership with New York City supported by a range of foundations, corporations, nonprofits, families, and individuals. Major partners include CSNYC; Robin Hood; Math for America (MƒA); Robin Hood Learning and Technology Fund; Oath Foundation; Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc.; the Hutchins Family Foundation; and Paulson Family Foundation. They are joined by additional partners such as Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen, & Katz; Hearst Foundations; the Ron Conway Family; The Rudin Foundation and the May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation; ABNY Foundation; Accenture; and Arconic Foundation. The Fund for Public Schools, CSNYC, and the Office of Strategic Partnerships at City Hall work together to develop and manage these partnerships.